Monthly Archives: January 2014

Open Letter to Worthington City Schools

An Open Letter to the Superintendent, Staff and employees of the Worthington City School system from a father of one of your students who lives two hours away:

Good day to you all.  Thank you, first and foremost, for the outstanding job that is reported to me by my daughter, a sixth grade student, and by her mother.  The evidence of your education excellence is reflected in the education she is achieving, and the inquiring mind she has developed, as well as social skills and those in music.  I commend you for it.

The past few years have presented challenges to the Primary and Secondary education professions that have to be difficult to manage.  With subzero wind chills, budget issues, and sadly, sociopathic individuals targeting children and schools for attack.  The last of these I would like to specifically address to you all.

Each of you, every day, is responsible for thousands of young souls.  I am sure they are each precious to you and unique and loved.  To a parent, they are more.  They are the reason we go without, the reason we keep going, the reason we smile, the reason we laugh, the person or persons in our lives who we would, without hesitation, stand in front of an oncoming car for.  Or, if need be, take any attack to keep it from going to them.  They are priceless, precious, and irreplaceable.  Please remember that.  There are thousands in your care, but to us as parents, our own is the most important, and likely one of our greatest reasons for keeping moving forward in this world.  We build hoping for better things for them, do our best to protect them, and trust you to care for them.

To that end, I, respectfully, ask that you continue to do everything you can to make your school system anything BUT a soft target.  I understand these measures are improved daily, but there must be, from each member of your staff, a singular dedication that you will NOT allow harm to come to our children, to my child.  No matter what it takes to accomplish this.  Maybe you didn’t go into education with the idea of being a protector.  The world we live in now forces you to step into that role, along with the thankless others you take on as an educator.  I regret having to require yet more of you, but you see, I’ve only got the one little girl.  I want to dance at her wedding, hold her babies, and share her life for as long as God grants me breath.  I EXPECT YOU TO PROTECT HER.  By any and all means legally available.

I understand the procedures you have in place.  I want you to do more.  I would like to see my child protected at the same level as a banker, or a bank, by people trained and dedicated to doing so.  I want you each to be trained in advanced first aid and trauma treatment.  To have the resources at your disposal in every classroom to use that training.  I would prefer that you all were highly trained and armed and that you had the conviction to stop any attacker instantly.  For you see, you are there, and I am not.  And the most precious person in the world to me is in your care.  Consider it strongly.

With all due respect,

Jerod J. Husvar, Father.

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Mrs. Hoose here with another helpful kitchen tip!

Even with our pantry shelves stocked mostly full, the temptation to run to the store every time I have a brain fart about dinner plans is all too high. It costs time, energy, and sodium.

Yes, sodium. We both need to watch out for it. When dinner plans have to change at the last minute, that frozen pizza or trip to Deathburgers R Us today can result in negative consequences tomorrow.

Here is the recipe we came up with for sauteed new potatoes. It’s relatively quick and very satisfying, without being too heavy on the salt. Plus, if they come out ahead of your main course, you can put a lid on the skillet and set them off the heat and they will stay warm.

  • 2 15 ounce cans new potatoes (drained,) either whole or sliced. (The whole ones will need to be sliced)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Seasonings to taste

Heat butter and olive oil on medium heat in a nonstick skillet. The butter and oil should be slightly foaming when you add the sliced potatoes.

Add potatoes and sprinkle some seasonings on the top. Stir occasionally, about every 2 minutes or so. Overworking the potatoes will result in them crumbling.

Keep stirring until potatoes are slightly golden brown, about 10-12 minutes.

I would share a picture, but we ate them before I had that idea. Oops! Maybe next time!

In defense of the 1911, and all others.

I don’t know how any of those hundreds of thousands of GI’s who carried 1911’s ever made it home alive… All with FMJ, too! It’s not about the tool, it’s about how you use it, maintain it, and train with it. Capacity is a factor, of course, as are many other things, but anyone who wants to try to tell me that 1911’s are unreliable and finicky and hard to work on I will HAPPILY take to a VFW hall of your choice and let the guys and gals there show you how fast someone who has TRAINED WITH THEIR WEAPON SYSTEM can tear down, clean, and reassemble one, and then we’ll go to the range and they can show you how horribly these guns shoot. Sure, it’s a 100 year old design, and there are newer, perhaps better designs, but the 1911 is NOT some mystical anachronism. Strangely, the United States Marine Corps just went BACK to a modified 1911 for their Close Quarter Battle Pistol. You can prefer a newer design, you can find it to be something that works better for you, but this bullshit of people saying it’s an unreliable and incapable firearm is getting on my nerves. Pick what works best for YOU and stop telling other people why they’re wrong. The gun YOU want is the gun YOU should shoot, use, carry, whatever. But don’t dog on someone else because they’ve decided to go a different route. If one design were the be all and end all, everyone would make it, carry it and use it and nothing else would need to be sold. the 1911 has stood the test of time, has been copied, modified, upgraded and made in nearly every caliber you can think of from .22LR to 32acp, 380acp, 9mm, .38 super, .40 S&W, 10mm, .45 ACP and yes, even .357 magnum. If it were such an inferior design, no one would bother.

Personally, if I wanted a 1911 for carry today I’d probably go buy a Colt® M1070CQBP, which is what the USMC is going to be using. I would then learn the few changes it has over the 1911’s I am familiar with, and love it long time. If you want to carry a Glock 17, a Walther PPK, a Smith and Wesson J-frame or a North American Arms .22LR revolver, well, God Bless You. Everyone has their own reasons for picking what they pick. I don’t understand the constant need to proselytize one design over another. There are VERY few bad firearms designs out there anymore, and even fewer poorly made weapons. In the day of the Internet, word gets around too quickly and a bad design or process can kill a company.

As to the Ruger SR1911, before you consider one I would HIGHLY recommend you google search “sr1911 rust.”

Sorry for the soapbox, but people need to understand that there is no one solution for everyone. Use what works for you, and be ready for what you have to. Period.

http://www.colt.com/Colt…/Products/ColtM1070CQBPM45A1.aspx
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